It’s that time of year again…complicated…?

So many kinds of wrong. The manipulation of women, families with no money, anyone physically or mentally vulnerable, heart-broken; the pressure to spend/consume, to cope and act jolly and the imposition of cultural norms, an expectation of conformity regardless of other faiths or persuasion is often unbearable at this time of year. Not to mention all the sugar or booze.

And yet and yet and yet, despite all that, I take a childish delight in Christmas and also Advent: this current period of time of preparing for it. It’s probably the time of year I feel most Polish and also recall childhood Christmases – both good and bad – (yes, it’s complicated) and somewhere in the middle of it all the sense of hope on the longest night.  Of course Christianity doesn’t have the monopoly on festivals of light or celebrations of the longest night in the year, Persians, Greeks, Romans, pagans, Hindus and Jews invented such rituals long before the Christians.

There are many traditions and customs which form part of the Polish celebrations with its main focus on Wigilia i.e Christmas Eve. I think one of my favourite is the laying of an extra place for an unexpected guest. A stranger who is to be welcomed. Given the recent track record of my two (birth and adopted) homelands, Poland and the U.K in welcoming refugees, increasingly this is a heinously enormous irony. I don’t imagine those in power read blogs such as this or listen if they do, but here’s a flicker sent out into the universe, a reminder that the extra place on the table doesn’t have a sign on it saying no Muslims or LGBTQ people for instance. Worth mentioning too how many LGBTQ people still dread times like Xmas when their families deny who they are or who they are with. There was a wonderful event in Brighton recently organised by Brighton Migrant Solidarity and Thousand 4 £1000 to raise money for supporting refugees. It included a reading from activist-poet Saradha Soobrayen and a film about the collective making of an amazing patchwork blanket for a refugee family. The project took as its name the first line of a verse inscribed on Brighton’s city gates as you drive in:

Hail Guest. We ask not what thou art
If friend, we greet thee, hand & heart
If stranger, such no longer be
If foe, our love shall conquer thee.

Too cheesy? That’s another thing I like about this time of year. Permission to be ultra cheesy! Angry, indignant too. Sad. Excited. Complicated…(See Death and the Devil included in the Christmas display from Kraków below.)